Tag Archives: Street Art

Art in the Park: Kiev’s Landscape Alley

Since Landscape Alley is situated pretty high up on a hill, it also provides some amazing views of the city.

We are back for a second look at Landscape Alley today. In the first part, I mentioned that all of the artwork and sculptures were created by Ukrainian artists. It is probably one of the most popular tourist destinations in the city, especially when taking into account that it’s free. The perspective of an outsider is that this is some great public art.

This playground is much more colorful than the standard ones at each of the apartment complexes.

When Landscape Alley first opened to the public in Kiev, I have been told that some local residents really liked it, while others thought it was an embarrassment to the city. They would exclaim that this was not art, and the artists were just trying to make a mockery of the city. Now that Landscape Alley has had time to grown on the residents, there was a collective agreement that more sculptures should be added to Landscape Alley.

This bench is a great piece in how imaginative and functional it is.

 

A sort of phenomenon that tourists might notice while trekking to the various attractions, is that young Ukrainian women dress up (maybe in their new favorite dress) then they go to some premeditated destination in the city with a trusted friend and will spend a lot of time taking pictures in front of statutes or posing in new settings. I am willing to bet that within a couple of hours those photos will appear on the Russian version of Facebook. This “hobby” can add time to your minute with the statue for family photos, but more importantly you are getting a taste of modern Ukrainian culture! Ukraine is a very image conscious place, they have more than one channel dedicated to fashion/model culture, so this may play a role in why you have a twenty something hanging out with the fanny pack crowd.

Part of the lure of Landscape Alley is how family friendly it is, and having multiple playgrounds in one relatively short walk is part of that reputation.
This is a little neighborhood in Kiev, tucked into a valley which is below Landscape Alley. It’s so quiet down there!

**Note to Readers: I am not from Ukraine and I have no language skills to speak of, so if you have any details to add about Ukraine, please don’t hesitate to bring them into the conversation! Thanks. Elise

 

 

 

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Art in the Park: Kiev’s Landscape Alley (Part 1 of 2)

This week is going to be devoted to looking at some of the urban art that Kiev has to offer. One of the more enduring and interactive exhibitions of Ukrainian urban art is Landscape Alley on the Right Bank of Kiev. To do this post, I had to get some help from Slava, who is much more knowledgeable than I about the history of this park. From the eyes of the outsider, this Landscape Alley (translated from Paysazhnaya Alleya) is a pleasant surprise that winds past some restaurants and parks. I first visited this park in October and then again this summer; during that time, Landscape Alley grew as locals embraced the park which resulted in the creation of new sculptures. Landscape Alley is almost always busy, with people of all ages taking a stroll or sitting to enjoy a beer while their children play. Most of the sculptures are made of colorful tiles and look very child friendly. The sculptures are humorous and playful, featuring references to famous children’s literature in some of the pieces. You would be hard pressed not to find a child bouncing from the playground (which functions as a piece of art itself) to a fountain or bench. Landscape Alley makes Kiev’s rather gray and neutral background pop to life. Dotted along the entrance to the park are usually young people sitting in a circle around a guitar or couples resting on a blanket.

A reference to the Princess and the Pea is what came to mind when I looked at this sculpture.
Locals posing for a picture.
There is practically a line to have your picture taken in front of most sculptures.

According to Fashion Park website Landscape Alley was a group effort, with pieces “created by Ukrainian artists: Nazar Bilyk, Zhanna Kadyrova, Konstantin Skritutskiy, Mihail Vertuozov, Alexey Vladimirov, Vasiliy Tatarskiy, Aleksander Alekseev, Vladimir Kuznetsov, Alexander Lidagovsky. There are also the unique garden benches designed from the sketches of well-known Ukrainian fashion designers: Alexey Zalevskiy, Lilia Pustovit, Andre Tan, Zinaida Lihacheva, Olga Gromova, Lilia Litkovskaya and Sergey Danchinov (for TM IDol)”. For locals, Landscape Alley can serve as a tribute to the local art community because it features artists that are native Ukrainians. These sculptures are a great family friendly destination to visit that is free in Kiev. If you notice the buildings that serve as the background for these pictures, you will notice how they contrast in spirit and character from the sculptures. The neighborhood that is home to Landscape Alley is not so pretentious, giving a tourists a peek into everyday life.

I was especially impressed by this mural, because the pictures allow the viewer to add so many details to the face, making it seem so real.

Check back on Friday for the second part of Landscape Alley and some cultural comments on how locals approach it.

**Note to readers: I am not from Ukraine, and lack language skills. In the spirit of not sounding like a know-it-all I will be happy to correct any unintended errors, feel free to contact me if you have anything to add to the conversation! Thanks, Elise

Yes, people do still throw coins in the fountain.

Street Art in Valparaiso

Until the birth of the Panama Canal, Valparaiso was arguably the most important port in the Pacific Southern Hemisphere. Valparaiso began not as an entirely separate city, but rather the port to Santiago. Through time, Valparaiso has created its own identity rooted in art, intellectual pursuits and the still busy port. While in Valparaiso, I was fortunate to be staying with a host family in nearby Vina Del Mar (the more polished neighbor to Valparaiso), I quickly learned that my Spanish is horrifically rusty. Midweek I came home after a long day, and tried to excuse my weak conversation at the dinner table with fatigue. I said to the family “Yo casada” which was followed by raised eyebrows and 5 very long seconds of silence. The next morning I learned from another girl in my group that my intended “I’m tired” (yo cansada) translated mistakenly to “I married” (yo casada). Sometimes all it takes is on letter differenc e to really mess up a conversation.

The street art in Valparaiso is fascinating. The city officials have a unique relationship with the street artists, who have sometimes asked permission to claim the spaces they paint. The art is laced with political statements and cultural symbols. The street art documents the historical characters that have shaped Chilean culture while incorporating the very current student movement. One part of Valparaiso is called the Open Sky Museum, where internationally renowned artists worked together to paint about 60 murals that are a part of public space.   The artists often will not sign their name on the murals, making them a common good for the city. As the art appeared, Valparaiso was able to use the art to transform the previously rundown historical neighborhoods into something that was not so typically gentrified.

The artist depicts the historic Valparaiso port and seaside scenery.

Sexual connotations while providing political commentary

At the bottom of the mural is a reference to the student movement that peaked in 2011 with mass protests and mass kiss ins and wildly coordinated Thriller dances which were led by Camilla Vallejo.

Notice how the mural benefits from the blue and red buildings it shares space with.

The Black Bloc reference to the very present anarchist movement.

This group of murals shows incredible variety in technique and style.